Tag Archives: acid reflux

The Pregnancy Heartburn Myth: Why Acid Reflux Affects Expecting Mothers and How You Can Lessen Your Symptoms

Expecting mothers often complain about painful heartburn throughout their pregnancies–and it’s often attributed to silly things.

For example, some people believe the amount of heartburn you experience while pregnant will be an indicator as to how much hair your baby will have…or even what gender your baby will be.

The truth is, however, it’s not actually the heart that is “burning”…it’s acid reflux. And, sorry to tell you, but there’s a really logical medical reason it happens, which has nothing at all to do with whether your baby will have flowing locks or not.

If you or someone you know is pregnant and is dealing with painful acid reflux symptoms, keep reading, because today I’m going to share why this condition happens and how you can ease your symptoms naturally.

Check it out…

Why Acid Reflux Affects Pregnant Women

If you’ve never ever experienced acid reflux symptoms, but you’re suddenly dealing with heartburn, regurgitation, burning, sore throats, etc.; you may be wondering “why now?”

After all, you’ve got enough other unpleasant symptoms to worry about with being pregnant…it’s really unfair you have to deal with acid reflux as well.

Yet, the majority of women who bear children tend to experience acid reflux at some point during their pregnancy.

There are two main reasons this occurs–and no, they have nothing to do with the wives’ tales about heartburn that you may have heard floating around.

The first reason is hormone changes.

Acid reflux occurs when your lower esophageal sphincter (LES) doesn’t completely close after food consumption. This allows for food and stomach acid to travel back up your esophagus.

When you experience hormonal changes due to pregnancy, the hormones can cause your esophagus muscles to relax more than they should. This leads to uncomfortable acid reflux symptoms.

The second reason acid reflux occurs in pregnant women is due to the growth of a baby in the uterus.

As a baby grows, he/she takes up space which, in return, moves and shifts the body’s organs.

This increased pressure and absence of normal space can cause food to travel back up your esophagus, once again causing acid reflux issues.

How to Naturally Soothe Acid Reflux Symptoms During Pregnancy

I personally don’t believe medications are the safest solutions to managing acid reflux…especially if you’re pregnant.

Instead, here’s what I recommend…

Solution #1 – Eat Small Meals throughout Your Day

If internal pressure is what’s causing you to suffer from acid reflux symptoms, eating small meals throughout your day might greatly reduce your acid reflux symptoms.

Eating small meals limits the volume of food matter in your stomach. The less food that’s there, the more difficult it is for the food to be pushed back up your esophagus.

Instead of doing three big meals a day, eat 5-8 small meals and snacks.

Solution #2 – Maintain a Healthy Weight

Most women will gain weight during pregnancy–and that’s a good thing!

But too much weight also contributes to painful acid reflux issues.

If you’re overweight, talk to your doctor about safe ways you can reduce your weight while you’re pregnant.

No matter what your weight is, be sure to continue to include exercise and healthy eating habits into your daily routine so you don’t gain too much weight during your pregnancy.

Solution #3 – Stay Upright after Eating

Lying down after a meal makes it easy for food and stomach acid to travel up your esophagus. If your LES is weakened, without a doubt, you’ll experience painful acid reflux symptoms.

In order to avoid this, I recommend that you stay upright after eating.

To lessen your symptoms even further, I recommend that you…

  • Abstain from eating at least 2 hours before bed.
  • Go for a walk after you eat–movement aids in digestion.
  • Sleep propped up with a pillow.

Looking for more helpful information on managing acid reflux symptoms while pregnant? Here’s some important info on why you should avoid proton pump inhibitors if you’re expecting.

Do I Have Acid Reflux or Heart Attack Symptoms?

Before we plunge into understanding whether you have acid reflux or heart attack symptoms, let me start off by saying this:

If you’re experiencing chest pain or signs of a heart attack, seek medical help right away. Delay can put your life at risk, and I encourage you to call 911 immediately.

Having said that…

Let’s address the fact that, when you think about GERD, images that come to your mind may include…

  • A person clutching his or her stomach in discomfort.
  • A medication commercial featuring a fire-related theme.
  • An ad that promises you’ll be able to enjoy your favorite foods.

Messages like these can lead you to think that acid reflux is mainly a gastric issue related to the foods you eat. The problem is, GERD can involve much more than a burning feeling in your stomach.

In fact, your GERD symptoms can masquerade as an oncoming heart attack. Keep on reading because, in this article, we’ll look at the similarities and differences between acid reflux and heart attack symptoms so you better understand this topic.

Let’s dive in…

Acid Reflux or Heart Attack: The Similarities in Symptoms

To begin with, both heart attacks and GERD have similar warning signs…which can be a bit unnerving.

For instance, whether you have acid reflux or a heart attack, you might experience chest pain. As Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D., the editor in chief for the Harvard Health Letter, explains…

The nerves that carry pain signals from the esophagus also carry pain signals from the heart, since both the esophagus and heart are located in the chest.

In fact, the Cleveland Clinic reports an astounding statistic, noting that GERD “causes 22 to 66 percent of non-cardiac chest pain.”

However, chest pain isn’t the only symptom shared between these two health conditions. Both heart attacks and GERD also share symptoms such as nausea and shortness of breath.

In the midst of this confusion, the good news is, there are some ways to distinguish between a bout of acid reflux and a heart attack…

Acid Reflux or Heart Attack: The Differences in Symptoms
While GERD symptoms and heart attack symptoms do share some similarities, their outward signs aren’t identical.

For instance, in the case of a heart attack, a person might experience…

(For more information on heart attacks, be sure to check out this resource from the American Heart Association.)

Tired of Thinking Your Acid Reflux Is a Heart Attack?

Maybe you’ve panicked—again and again—over false alarms…only to learn your GERD was to blame.

Maybe you can relate to Jill Moore.

As Jill explained, “Every time I took ambulance rides to the emergency room, I thought I was in cardiac arrest. But really, it was just my acid reflux, which controlled my life.”

Even though Jill took two pills a day (not to mention more medications to counteract the side effects of her prescription)…she wasn’t seeing results.

As Jill said, “I thought there was nothing I could do to eliminate my acid reflux.”

However, today, Jill no longer suffers from debilitating reflux like she once did…and she’s no longer making trips to the ER.

What changed?

Instead of masking her symptoms, Jill took steps to naturally address her GERD and regain her health with my Cure Your Acid Reflux System—an approach designed to reverse acid reflux symptoms without harmful medications.

Ready to find relief from heartburn and pseudo heart attacks? Click here to take the first step toward relief.

The Best Vitamins for Acid Reflux Sufferers

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If you haven’t already explored which vitamins for acid reflux to include in your healing efforts, there’s no time like the present.

Upon receiving a diagnosis for acid reflux, perhaps you’ve made some basic changes to your lifestyle, such as…

  • Avoiding trigger foods.
  • Sleeping in an elevated position.
  • Leaving enough time between eating dinner and sleeping (at least three hours, in case you were wondering!).
  • Wearing loose clothing to relieve pressure on your abdomen.

However, perhaps you haven’t considered how improving your nutrition can support your journey toward a life free of acid reflux or GERD symptoms.

That’s why it’s important to learn about the various foods and their vitamins that serve as excellent healing solutions for acid reflux sufferers.

It’s important to note that eating foods rich in certain vitamins should be the only method you use to achieve the benefits they provide.

When consumed as a pill vitamin, these vitamins can often do more harm than good.

Many people end up taking too high of a dose, and according to Mayo Clinic, “Dietary supplements aren’t intended to be a food substitute because they can’t replicate all of the nutrients and benefits of whole foods.”

Wondering which nutrients to intentionally include in your diet and daily routine? Read on to discover a list of helpful vitamins for acid reflux…

Vitamin B-12, Vitamin B-6, and Folic Acid

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When it comes to vitamins for acid reflux, you can’t underestimate the power of a certain group of B vitamins.

A 2006 study published in the Journal of Pineal Research found that vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6, and folic acid (also a B vitamin) can be used to decrease acid reflux symptoms.

In the study, one group of acid reflux patients took a supplement containing vitamins B-12, B-6, and folic acid.

100% of the participants in this group reported a decrease in symptoms after 40 days of treatment.

Another group of subjects took omeprazole, an over-the-counter treatment for acid reflux. Only 65.7% of the participants in this second group experienced a decrease in symptoms.

With results like that, it’s hard to deny that it would be wise to up your intake of B vitamins.

When it comes to knowing which foods contain B vitamins…

  • Vitamin B-6 is in foods such as meat, poultry, beans, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Vitamin B-12 is in animal-based foods such as poultry, fish, eggs, red meat, and dairy.
  • Folic Acid, also called folate, is in beans and green leafy vegetables. Additionally, whole grain breads and cereals may also be fortified with this essential vitamin.

Vitamins A, C, and E

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Antioxidants, such as vitamins A, C, and E, work to protect our bodies from free radical damage.

This is particularly important for acid reflux sufferers because free radicals cause illness and infection that may worsen or trigger acid reflux symptoms.

According to a 2012 study, eating foods rich in these antioxidant vitamins will help relieve your symptoms and generally improve your digestive health.

You may be wondering which foods contain these vitamins.

  • Vitamin A is in squash, carrots, spinach, liver, and eggs.
  • Vitamin C is in broccoli, watermelon, cantaloupe, papaya, honeydew, and mango—all of which have low acidic content. Remember that foods with high acidity, such as oranges and lemons, aren’t the best if you want to avoid heartburn.
  • Vitamin E is in foods such as spinach, olive oil, avocado, nuts, and nut butter.

Whether you’re whipping up a salad with avocado and olive oil or blending a spinach and nut butter smoothie, there are many ways to include vitamin E in your diet.
From vitamin B-12 to vitamin E, make a list of the nutrients we’ve listed in this post, and keep these in mind the next time you go shopping at the grocery store, or farmers market. It’s a great way to complement other ways of naturally minimizing your symptoms.

Lastly–remember that you should be consuming vitamins via the foods you eat–not from taking them in supplement form.

Having a hard time staying away from triggers such as coffee, beef, and tomatoes? Click here to learn about five delicious foods you can substitute for GERD trigger foods!

Green smoothies

5 Food Substitutes for GERD Triggers

Going grocery shopping.

Ordering delivery on your lunch break.

Going on a date at a fancy new restaurant.

Getting together with friends for a potluck.

There are countless occasions in our lives in which food is involved. It’s no wonder that when we’re told to rule out certain foods or add in food substitutes to our diets, things can get complicated.

Several decades ago, attempting to eat a certain way might have raised eyebrows or elicited a “come again?” from a waiter.

However, these days, people are becoming more educated on food sensitivities, and it’s easier to adjust their diets to coincide with their bodies’ unique dietary needs.

If you suffer from acid reflux or GERD, you know all too well that certain foods will activate pesky and uncomfortable symptoms such as indigestion and heartburn.

However, rather than lamenting the fact that you can no longer consume your grandmother’s famous tomato sauce, you can choose to be proactive in finding delicious food alternatives that won’t trigger your GERD symptoms.

Here are five food substitutes to replace common GERD triggers.

#1: Instead of White Rice…Try Quinoa.

quinoa

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White rice, among other grains such as wheat and corn, is highly acidic and acid-forming.

On the other hand, grains such as quinoa, amaranth, and wild rice are alkaline-forming, which won’t trigger GERD.

Quinoa also has the benefit of being super high in protein and has twice as much fiber as other grains–a healthy option overall!

The next time you’re selecting a grain for the base in a veggie dish, think twice before grabbing white rice and go for something like quinoa.

#2: Instead of Coffee…Try Ginger Tea.

Ginger Tea

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Having a daily cup of joe is a ritual that’s deeply ingrained in many cultures around the world.

If you consider yourself a coffee addict, you may have a hard time giving it up.

However, caffeine tends to relax the esophageal sphincter, allowing acid to flow back up through the esophagus. Dealing with the resulting unease and discomfort in your body is never quite worth it.

If you must satisfy your need to enjoy a warm and cozy beverage in the morning or evening–opt for ginger tea with honey.

In addition to reducing the likelihood of stomach acid flowing up through the esophagus, ginger also reduces inflammation in your gastrointestinal tract.

Sounds like a win-win all around!

#3: Instead of Beef…Try Fish.

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When it comes to the consumption of protein-rich foods, your mind may drift to beef or other meat sources.

However, beef and other meats that are high in protein and fat can take longer for your body to digest, which puts pressure on your lower esophageal sphincter for a longer time.

The result? Increased instances of acid reflux.

On the other hand, fish and poultry are both lean proteins and are often recommended for acid reflux sufferers.

That said–everyone’s body is different–so if you notice that fish or poultry still triggers your symptoms, try switching to plant-based proteins such as soy and sprouts.

#4: Instead of Orange Juice…Try a Banana-Kale Smoothie.

Banana and Kale smoothie

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Perhaps you have cravings for something sweet in the mornings, and you typically fulfill these cravings with a glass of OJ.

I’m sorry to tell you that due to their high acidity, citrus-based juices are not your friend if you want to minimize GERD symptoms.

Not to worry–there are plenty of other delicious juices and smoothies you can enjoy that aren’t acid-producing in the way citrus fruit juices are.

For example, a banana and kale smoothie is a sweet non-citrus alternative that can help you start your day off on the right foot.

If you want to give it a try, check out this banana and kale smoothie recipe!

#5: Instead of Tomato Sauce…Try Pesto.

Pesto sauce

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Tomato sauce may have been your go-to when it came to eating pizza or pasta, but with the high acidity of tomatoes, which often leads to heartburn, I strongly advise you seek alternatives.

Fortunately, there are other sauce options that can be equally tasty–such as pesto.

With the combination of basil, olive oil, pine nuts, and garlic, pesto provides a wonderful aromatic scent in addition to a tasty kick to a range of dishes.

Whether you add it to pasta or pizza or spread it on a sandwich, there are various ways to incorporate pesto in your meals.

Making dietary changes for your health may feel like a burden, but feeling better in your body is always rewarding.

Beyond the foods listed above, probiotics are terrific options for people who suffer from GERD or acid reflux. Here are five probiotic options to add to your shopping cart this week!

motherhood, pregnancy

4 Ways to Soothe Acid Reflux During Pregnancy

The nine months of expecting a child is a thrilling time for soon-to-be mothers (and fathers!).

From decorating a baby room to selecting a name, there’s a range of exciting elements that occur over the course of the nine months in preparation of welcoming a son or daughter into a family.

However, as per usual, good things in life also come with a few less-than-ideal aspects–one of which can be acid reflux.

Expectant mothers-to-be often experience heartburn and indigestion that come along with acid reflux due to the fact that they have higher levels of progesterone, which is the hormone that relaxes muscles in pregnancy.

Along with relaxing the uterus during pregnancy, progesterone also relaxes the stomach valve that keeps acid out of the esophagus.

You can guess what happens next–stomach acid easily passes up through the esophagus, causing the uncomfortable symptoms of indigestion and heartburn.

Here are four ways to minimize these symptoms during pregnancy, enabling you to have a more enjoyable and comfortable experience in the nine months before your child is born.

#1: Wear loose-fitting clothes.

heartburn, loose clothing, pregnancy, acid reflux

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If you’re determined to continue to wear tight-fitting jeans during your pregnancy, you might as well give up your goal of minimizing acid reflux symptoms.

Tighter clothing puts more pressure on your abdomen, which increases the likelihood of acid traveling up through your esophageal sphincter.

Instead, opt for wearing looser clothing. With a range of stylish and comfortable maternity wear available online or at various stores, you don’t have to worry about finding appropriate options.

#2: Eat smaller meals–slowly.

eat slowly. acid reflux, heartburn

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Similar to the way that wearing tight clothing can put pressure on your abdomen, contributing to heartburn and indigestion, eating large meals has the same negative effect.  

Therefore, rather than eating three large meals a day, aim to eat five or six smaller-portioned meals.

Additionally, rushing through your meal won’t do you any favors.

Try to eat your food at a relaxed pace, enjoying each delicious bite. This will also help ensure that you don’t unintentionally overeat.

#3: Don’t eat right before sleeping.

clock, acid reflux, nigh time snacks

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I get it–life can get busy, and sometimes you find yourself eating at the end of the day, just before you head to sleep.

However, it’s best to allow your body the time to digest food before lying down to sleep. Otherwise you may find yourself awakening to painful heartburn in the middle of the night.

Aim to eat dinner two to three hours before bedtime, and you’ll be golden.

#4: Sleep upright.

Once you have digested and are ready for bed, it’s important to note that the position in which you sleep matters.

Elevate your head and upper chest so that they are higher than your abdomen. Doing so discourages acid from following upwards into your esophagus.

Incorporate the four tips above in your day-to-day life, and I guarantee you’ll experience less instances of heartburn–making your pregnancy experience more enjoyable!

Looking for the perfect pillow to help you achieve the ideal sleeping position? Learn about an excellent option in my post This Acid Reflux Pillow Can Work Wonders.

Stomach Cancer: One of Many PPI Risks

 

It’s no secret that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) carry a number of dangers for your health.

PPI risks range from death to dementia, and you’ll find a number of disturbing studies on PPIs in medical literature.

Despite this fact, doctors throughout America commonly prescribe PPIs to acid reflux sufferers. As NPR reports, the estimated number of Americans taking PPIs is in the millions.

And, the reality is, many PPI users either don’t know—or don’t acknowledge—the possible consequences of popping that daily pill.

If you regularly take PPIs, don’t let this be you.

No matter how severe your GERD is, it’s critical that you understand PPI risks and make informed decisions about your health.

In this article, we’re covering another one of the PPI risks that recently hit the headlines—stomach cancer. But, most importantly, we’ll show you an alternative for your acid reflux challenges.

Adding to the List of PPI Risks—Stomach Cancer

If you have acid reflux, you probably turned to PPIs to minimize your painful symptoms.

But there’s another reason you might have decided to take PPIs, especially if you have chronic GERD—you didn’t want to raise your risk for esophageal cancer.

If avoiding cancer was a motivating factor…

Then you’ll want to read the results of a study from the British Medical Journal Gut, a study that reveals a link between PPIs and gastric cancer risk.

As PubMed Health explains, this study “identified everyone who’d had successful treatment for H. pylori infection in a Hong Kong database, and followed them for an average of 7 years.”

The results?

Researchers reported that they found a correlation between PPIs and stomach cancer risk for patients.

What’s more, PubMed Health explains that this “risk was higher for people taking them [PPIs] long term and daily – an eightfold, or 834%, increase in risk.”

Important Considerations in the Study

  • Like any study, this research involves a number of important considerations and limitations. Before you draw your conclusions, here’s what PubMed Health had to say…
  • The evidence didn’t prove that PPIs cause gastric cancer. (In other words, there’s a link but not causation.)
    The research population was predominantly Chinese, and “Asians are known to have a higher risk of developing stomach cancer than other populations.”
  • H. plylori “is known to raise the risk of stomach cancer.” (However, be sure to take this statement from PubMed Health in consideration with other facts. For instance, the researchers stated their study included H2 blockers—another type of acid reflux medication used to treat H. pylori infections—and found that these didn’t increase gastric cancer risk.)

PPI Risks and Your Health

Despite any caveats the study may include, one fact is clear…

This study casts the safety of PPI medications into doubt.

Even without a causative link, this study makes another case for PPI risks—risks you should seriously consider if you rely on proton pump inhibitors for your GERD.

The good news is, there’s no need to increase your risk for cancer, dementia, heart issues, or other health problems….simply because you don’t have options other than PPIs.

If you’re looking for a solution to your acid reflux problem that helps you avoid taking dangerous medications or placing yourself in danger of PPI risks, try the Cure Your Acid Reflux Program.

Our program helps you address the underlying issues behind your GERD, guiding you step-by-step to heal your gut, improve your symptoms, and—ultimately—get off your PPI medications.

Enroll in the Cure Your Acid Reflux Program today!

This Acid Reflux Pillow Can Work Wonders

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Imagine lying down for a good night’s sleep, only to wake up in the morning greeted by a burning sensation in your chest and throat.

If you suffer from acid reflux or GERD, this frustrating hypothetical scenario may actually sound all too familiar.

Living with acid reflux or GERD forces you to make lifestyle changes in order to minimize symptoms such as indigestion and heartburn.

These lifestyle changes may include wearing looser clothes, shifting your diet to avoid certain trigger foods, and even changing the position in which you sleep by using an acid reflux pillow.

Your Sleep Position and Acid Reflux

Sleeping in a position where your head is located at the same level as the abdomen can play a role in exacerbating acid reflux symptoms.

This is due to the fact that, when in this position, acid in the stomach is more easily able to reach the esophagus.

If you suffer from acid reflux, you are probably already aware that symptoms occur due to the fact that your lower esophageal sphincter (LES) malfunctions and allows the acid to pass back up through the esophagus, causing discomfort in your throat and chest.

The negative side effects extend beyond simply uncomfortable symptoms.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, if you leave nocturnal GERD untreated, you’re at a higher risk of developing adenocarcinoma of the esophagus, Barrett’s esophagus, erosive esophagitis, esophageal ulcerations, or peptic strictures.

The Acid Reflux Pillow Solution

On the bright side, the ingenuity of medical device inventors and innovators have made life easier for acid reflux sufferers who wish to avoid pesky flare-ups of indigestion and heartburn.

Wedge-shaped pillows were created years ago and are a common solution. However, they can be uncomfortable and don’t always help you maintain an upright position through the night.  

Additionally, a doctor at the Cleveland Clinic conducted a study to see if the side you sleep on affected the symptoms of GERD.

Gastroenterologist Scott Gabbard, MD says “What [the doctor] found was that lying on the left side separates food and acid from the valve, which means less acid will back up into the esophagus.”

The good news is, the MedCline pillow is a recently developed product for acid reflux sufferers to achieve an optimal sleeping position and minimize uncomfortable flare-ups.

You may be wondering why the MedCline pillow is a more effective acid reflux pillow than a standard sleep wedge.

Essentially, the MedCline pillow…

  • Prevents you from rolling over in your sleep.
  • Enables you to sleep comfortably on your side.
  • Helps you avoid sliding down.
  • Creates the ideal sleeping position–with the right incline on your left side.
  • Eliminates pressure on your downside arm and shoulder.

The other plus is that your sleep mate won’t be disturbed–the pillow provides individualized relief and only takes up ½ the width of a queen bed.

Outcomes of Using the MedCline Acid Reflux Pillow

The results speak for themselves–various studies have found that…

  • 95% of patients reported an overall improvement in sleep quality when using MedCline.
  • 93% of patients reported a reduction in nighttime heartburn when using MedCline.
  • 89% of patients reported a reduction in regurgitation and gagging at night due to reflux when using MedCline.

These numbers are certainly impressive–which is why so many people are excited about trying out the MedCline pillow.

Though this acid reflux pillow isn’t cheap–it costs $348–it can save you money in the long term by cutting down on the need to buy expensive medication such as PPIs and antacids.

Investing in a better night’s sleep and a reduction in acid reflux symptoms via natural methods will be worth your while.

Your sleep position is just one example of an acid reflux risk factor. Learn about three more in this post–you’ll be one step closer to minimizing those pesky and uncomfortable symptoms!

The Link between Inflammation and GERD

If you have acid reflux and you’ve sought help at the doctor’s office, you may have walked away from your appointment with a prescription that brought welcome relief.

However, perhaps you’re finding you traded physical relief for your mental peace of mind.

While you now have decreased symptoms, you’re not sure pills are the best solution for your heartburn. And maybe you’re even questioning your doctor’s explanations when it comes to heartburn and digestive disorders.

If you have more questions than answers, keep on reading because we’re going to look at a study published in JAMA that reveals a critical piece of information you need to know for your symptoms…

There may be a link between inflammation and your GERD.

Check out some details from this study…and what they mean for your acid reflux struggles.

Inflammation and GERD: The Study’s Conclusions

The U.S. News and World Report explains that this research study indicates GERD acid may not be the direct cause of esophageal damage, noting that this data can potentially overturn 80 years of scientific consensus.  

Summing up the study, the article reveals that something quite different may be the real reason behind the damage your esophagus is experiencing—your body secretes proteins that “produce an inflammatory response in the esophagus.”

Hearing that esophageal damage isn’t directly caused by your refluxed stomach acid may sound counterintuitive.

However, you’ll want to carefully consider the evidence researchers gathered indicating that there’s a link between inflammation and GERD before you make a decision…

Finding the Link between Acid Reflux and Inflammation

According to an article in Medscape on the study, the research participants developed symptoms of GERD in their esophagus in areas where acid had not eroded the surface of their esophagus.

In other words, there were GERD symptoms where there was no evidence of stomach acid damage.  

To make sense of this data and understand how researchers found a link between GERD and inflammation, you might want to read Newsmax’s summary of the study.

Newsmax notes that researchers found evidence supporting a new concept for GERD: acid reflux triggers the production of cytokines, the result of which is inflammation.  

What This Study Means for You

While this study shows that there may be a link between inflammation and GERD, you may wonder what it means for you and your acid reflux symptoms.

To begin with, this data reveals the serious effects of inflammation. Inflammation isn’t something you simply feel in your joints after a vigorous exercise. It can potentially create esophageal damage.

But, even more importantly, this study shows how easy it is to get your facts wrong when it comes to acid reflux.

From what creates esophageal damage to how to heal your reflux, many times, what you hear at your typical doctor’s office regarding acid reflux isn’t the full story you need to make the best decision.    

At Cure Your Acid Reflux, we’re here to offer a different perspective and help you leverage a healthy, alternative approach for treating your GERD…and it doesn’t have anything to do with taking PPIs, H2 blockers, or other medications.

We’ve found that eliminating your diet of inflammatory foods and promoting gut health reverses acid reflux symptoms so you experience relief.

Find freedom from dangerous medication and burning, painful heartburn. Join the Cure Your Acid Reflux Program today.

Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Death—What You Need to Know

Proton pump inhibitors are a common drug used to treat acid reflux.

But that doesn’t mean they’re safe.

Maybe you’ve recently received a GERD diagnosis, and your doctor prescribed PPIs to treat your symptoms. Or perhaps you’ve been on proton pump inhibitors for years and don’t think it’s possible to live a normal life without them.

No matter your situation, here’s what you need to know…

In July 2017, the British Medical Journal Open published research announcing that proton pump inhibitors are associated with the risk of death.

And if you regularly take PPIs, the research presented in this study is something you can’t ignore.

In this article, we’ll cover what researchers discovered, what their findings mean for you, and how you can find a better solution for acid reflux relief.

PPIs and Risk of Death—What the Study Revealed

According to the study, scholars conducted a longitudinal study on US veterans, analyzing groups of individuals ranging from over 300,000 to over 3 million.

The goal of the study was to “examine the association between PPI use and risk of all-cause mortality.” And, while the data is a bit complicated, the study revealed some grim facts about proton pump inhibitors.

After statistical evaluation, researchers found that…  

  • The use of PPIs seemed to be associated with increased death risk compared with those who had never taken PPIs as well as those who had never taken acid suppression therapies.
  • New users of PPIs had a greater risk of death compared to new users of H2 blockers.
  • Prolonged use of proton pump inhibitors increases risk of death.

What the Study Means If You’re Taking Proton Pump Inhibitors  

Whether you’ve been taking PPIs for years or have just started taking your prescription, it’s critical to seriously examine what decision you want to make in light of this research.

It’s true.

Most medications carry some risk. But the reality is, some risks are more serious than others.

From the data revealed in the BMJ Open article, your risk might be death.

While the study notes that limiting proton pump inhibitor use “may be warranted,” the real question you face is what kind of gamble do you want to take with your health.  

You need to ask yourself questions like…

  • Am I willing to possibly increase my risk of death with the medication I take each day?
  • Did my doctor warn me of these risks when he or she prescribed PPIs?  
  • Are PPIs the best option I have to treat my acid reflux, or is there another solution?

If you feel torn between knowing your risks, but recognizing the pain your acid reflux creates, there’s good news…

The Better Solution for GERD Link   

When it comes to acid reflux, there’s no need to choose between experiencing relief or protecting your health.

You can avoid medication, and you can reverse your painful acid reflux symptoms. 

At Cure Your Acid Reflux, we’ve created a program to help you find freedom from GERD and deal with the real reasons behind your acid reflux.

Instead of relying on proton pump inhibitors, when you join the Cure Your Acid Reflux Program, you’ll gain…

  • A customized analysis of what you’re experiencing to provide a tailored plan to alleviate your pain.  
  • A Cure Your Coach to help you understand what steps to take to restore your digestive system.   
  • Supplements to give your body the tools it needs to repair.

Don’t rely on dangerous PPIs or ineffective medications.

Get to the bottom of your symptoms, and take the first step toward medication-free relief when you enroll in the Cure Your Acid Reflux Program today.

The Bulimia & Acid Reflux Connection

Scales

In many industrialized countries, there’s a lot of societal pressure to look a certain way and be a certain size.

Unfortunately, correlating self worth with body weight has led many people to unhealthy obsessions and preoccupations with their body’s figure and the number on the scale.

Bulimia, anorexia, and other eating disorders have become increasingly common over the last half century. In fact, today 10-15% of all Americans suffer from some type of serious eating disorder.

Bulimia nervosa is characterized by bouts of extreme overeating followed by fasting or self-induced vomiting. The condition can become life-threatening in many circumstances if it goes untreated.

In addition to a loss of body fat, there are other negative effects of bulimia to one’s health.

One of the negative side-effects of continual self-induced vomiting is that the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) becomes weakened or damaged over time.

A healthy LES opens when a person is eating food, and stays tightly shut when they aren’t.

However, with the continual vomiting that occurs for people with bulimia, the LES malfunctions and will allow stomach acid to come back up through the esophagus.

When this happens, people experience heartburn and indigestion. In some cases, symptoms can progress to the point that people are unable to eat a regular sized meal without vomiting involuntarily.

If you have (or had) bulimia nervosa and experience these symptoms, then you are most likely suffering from acid reflux or GERD, a more severe form of reflux.

It’s important that you take steps to treating and curing your acid reflux.

Untreated GERD can result in damage to the esophagus due to acid, which can lead to a condition called Barrett’s Esophagus and potentially esophageal cancer.

If your battle with bulimia has caused you to develop acid reflux, there’s a few things you can do to begin the healing process and prevent the flare-up of symptoms.

Give Your Body Time to Digest Before Sleeping

You can minimize occurrences of indigestion and heartburn by eating at at least three hours before going to sleep or lying down.

Elevating your head while sleeping can also help. Use pillows or raise the head of your bed six to eight inches by placing wooden blocks under your bedposts.

Changing the Size and Frequency of Meals.

To minimize instances of bringing, people in eating disorder recovery are advised to add structure to their meal consumption.

This usually means eating three pre-planned meals and three snacks a day, aiming to eat every three hours.

You should try to eat more slowly, remain relaxed during meal times, and pay more attention to chewing food.

Luckily, following these suggestions kills two birds with one stone–they can also reduce GERD symptoms.

Focus on Foods That Won’t Trigger Symptoms.

Several types of food can cause acid reflux and heartburn. There can include fatty or fried foods, alcohol, coffee, soda, citrus fruits, and tomatoes.

That said, if you are in eating disorder recovery, it can work against you to create new food rules. If your frame of mind is too focused on all the food you “shouldn’t” eat, you are at risk for creating more unhealthy and damaging food rules.

My suggestion for healthy eating disorder and acid reflux recovery is to focus on all of the foods that can help lessen GERD symptoms.

These include vegetables, ginger, oatmeal, non-citrus fruits, lean meats, and healthy fats.

Learning to blend your bulimia and acid reflux processes may take some practice, but in the end it will be worth it.

If you deal with Acid Reflux and are curious about how to heal it naturally, click here to learn more