Tag Archives: acid reflux relief

The Best Vitamins for Acid Reflux Sufferers

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If you haven’t already explored which vitamins for acid reflux to include in your healing efforts, there’s no time like the present.

Upon receiving a diagnosis for acid reflux, perhaps you’ve made some basic changes to your lifestyle, such as…

  • Avoiding trigger foods.
  • Sleeping in an elevated position.
  • Leaving enough time between eating dinner and sleeping (at least three hours, in case you were wondering!).
  • Wearing loose clothing to relieve pressure on your abdomen.

However, perhaps you haven’t considered how improving your nutrition can support your journey toward a life free of acid reflux or GERD symptoms.

That’s why it’s important to learn about the various foods and their vitamins that serve as excellent healing solutions for acid reflux sufferers.

It’s important to note that eating foods rich in certain vitamins should be the only method you use to achieve the benefits they provide.

When consumed as a pill vitamin, these vitamins can often do more harm than good.

Many people end up taking too high of a dose, and according to Mayo Clinic, “Dietary supplements aren’t intended to be a food substitute because they can’t replicate all of the nutrients and benefits of whole foods.”

Wondering which nutrients to intentionally include in your diet and daily routine? Read on to discover a list of helpful vitamins for acid reflux…

Vitamin B-12, Vitamin B-6, and Folic Acid

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When it comes to vitamins for acid reflux, you can’t underestimate the power of a certain group of B vitamins.

A 2006 study published in the Journal of Pineal Research found that vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6, and folic acid (also a B vitamin) can be used to decrease acid reflux symptoms.

In the study, one group of acid reflux patients took a supplement containing vitamins B-12, B-6, and folic acid.

100% of the participants in this group reported a decrease in symptoms after 40 days of treatment.

Another group of subjects took omeprazole, an over-the-counter treatment for acid reflux. Only 65.7% of the participants in this second group experienced a decrease in symptoms.

With results like that, it’s hard to deny that it would be wise to up your intake of B vitamins.

When it comes to knowing which foods contain B vitamins…

  • Vitamin B-6 is in foods such as meat, poultry, beans, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Vitamin B-12 is in animal-based foods such as poultry, fish, eggs, red meat, and dairy.
  • Folic Acid, also called folate, is in beans and green leafy vegetables. Additionally, whole grain breads and cereals may also be fortified with this essential vitamin.

Vitamins A, C, and E

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Antioxidants, such as vitamins A, C, and E, work to protect our bodies from free radical damage.

This is particularly important for acid reflux sufferers because free radicals cause illness and infection that may worsen or trigger acid reflux symptoms.

According to a 2012 study, eating foods rich in these antioxidant vitamins will help relieve your symptoms and generally improve your digestive health.

You may be wondering which foods contain these vitamins.

  • Vitamin A is in squash, carrots, spinach, liver, and eggs.
  • Vitamin C is in broccoli, watermelon, cantaloupe, papaya, honeydew, and mango—all of which have low acidic content. Remember that foods with high acidity, such as oranges and lemons, aren’t the best if you want to avoid heartburn.
  • Vitamin E is in foods such as spinach, olive oil, avocado, nuts, and nut butter.

Whether you’re whipping up a salad with avocado and olive oil or blending a spinach and nut butter smoothie, there are many ways to include vitamin E in your diet.
From vitamin B-12 to vitamin E, make a list of the nutrients we’ve listed in this post, and keep these in mind the next time you go shopping at the grocery store, or farmers market. It’s a great way to complement other ways of naturally minimizing your symptoms.

Lastly–remember that you should be consuming vitamins via the foods you eat–not from taking them in supplement form.

Having a hard time staying away from triggers such as coffee, beef, and tomatoes? Click here to learn about five delicious foods you can substitute for GERD trigger foods!

Green smoothies

5 Food Substitutes for GERD Triggers

Going grocery shopping.

Ordering delivery on your lunch break.

Going on a date at a fancy new restaurant.

Getting together with friends for a potluck.

There are countless occasions in our lives in which food is involved. It’s no wonder that when we’re told to rule out certain foods or add in food substitutes to our diets, things can get complicated.

Several decades ago, attempting to eat a certain way might have raised eyebrows or elicited a “come again?” from a waiter.

However, these days, people are becoming more educated on food sensitivities, and it’s easier to adjust their diets to coincide with their bodies’ unique dietary needs.

If you suffer from acid reflux or GERD, you know all too well that certain foods will activate pesky and uncomfortable symptoms such as indigestion and heartburn.

However, rather than lamenting the fact that you can no longer consume your grandmother’s famous tomato sauce, you can choose to be proactive in finding delicious food alternatives that won’t trigger your GERD symptoms.

Here are five food substitutes to replace common GERD triggers.

#1: Instead of White Rice…Try Quinoa.

quinoa

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White rice, among other grains such as wheat and corn, is highly acidic and acid-forming.

On the other hand, grains such as quinoa, amaranth, and wild rice are alkaline-forming, which won’t trigger GERD.

Quinoa also has the benefit of being super high in protein and has twice as much fiber as other grains–a healthy option overall!

The next time you’re selecting a grain for the base in a veggie dish, think twice before grabbing white rice and go for something like quinoa.

#2: Instead of Coffee…Try Ginger Tea.

Ginger Tea

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Having a daily cup of joe is a ritual that’s deeply ingrained in many cultures around the world.

If you consider yourself a coffee addict, you may have a hard time giving it up.

However, caffeine tends to relax the esophageal sphincter, allowing acid to flow back up through the esophagus. Dealing with the resulting unease and discomfort in your body is never quite worth it.

If you must satisfy your need to enjoy a warm and cozy beverage in the morning or evening–opt for ginger tea with honey.

In addition to reducing the likelihood of stomach acid flowing up through the esophagus, ginger also reduces inflammation in your gastrointestinal tract.

Sounds like a win-win all around!

#3: Instead of Beef…Try Fish.

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When it comes to the consumption of protein-rich foods, your mind may drift to beef or other meat sources.

However, beef and other meats that are high in protein and fat can take longer for your body to digest, which puts pressure on your lower esophageal sphincter for a longer time.

The result? Increased instances of acid reflux.

On the other hand, fish and poultry are both lean proteins and are often recommended for acid reflux sufferers.

That said–everyone’s body is different–so if you notice that fish or poultry still triggers your symptoms, try switching to plant-based proteins such as soy and sprouts.

#4: Instead of Orange Juice…Try a Banana-Kale Smoothie.

Banana and Kale smoothie

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Perhaps you have cravings for something sweet in the mornings, and you typically fulfill these cravings with a glass of OJ.

I’m sorry to tell you that due to their high acidity, citrus-based juices are not your friend if you want to minimize GERD symptoms.

Not to worry–there are plenty of other delicious juices and smoothies you can enjoy that aren’t acid-producing in the way citrus fruit juices are.

For example, a banana and kale smoothie is a sweet non-citrus alternative that can help you start your day off on the right foot.

If you want to give it a try, check out this banana and kale smoothie recipe!

#5: Instead of Tomato Sauce…Try Pesto.

Pesto sauce

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Tomato sauce may have been your go-to when it came to eating pizza or pasta, but with the high acidity of tomatoes, which often leads to heartburn, I strongly advise you seek alternatives.

Fortunately, there are other sauce options that can be equally tasty–such as pesto.

With the combination of basil, olive oil, pine nuts, and garlic, pesto provides a wonderful aromatic scent in addition to a tasty kick to a range of dishes.

Whether you add it to pasta or pizza or spread it on a sandwich, there are various ways to incorporate pesto in your meals.

Making dietary changes for your health may feel like a burden, but feeling better in your body is always rewarding.

Beyond the foods listed above, probiotics are terrific options for people who suffer from GERD or acid reflux. Here are five probiotic options to add to your shopping cart this week!

Acid Reflux Treatments: Nutrition versus Proton Pump Inhibitors

The treatment of choice for acid reflux, the proton pump inhibitor or PPI, is no treatment at all. A PPI is a type of drug that produces a profound reduction in the stomach’s production of gastric acid (stomach acid).

Most doctors believe too much stomach acid causes acid reflux, so decreasing that acid is how we should treat reflux. Nexium, Prilosec, and Prevacid are just a few of the PPIs regularly prescribed to reduce gastric acid.

These doctors couldn’t be more wrong.

Acid reflux is caused by too little acid in the stomach, so reducing it makes the situation worse. When your esophageal sphincter stays open, as it does when you have too little stomach acid, the contents of your stomach splash up and cause reflux symptoms.

When you take a PPI, the symptoms may subside in the beginning, but the acid reflux returns. Often, the PPI dosage increases, which simply makes the reflux worse. PPIs carry a label that warns against using them for more than 14 days a year.

Most people who use PPIs take them every day for many years, and they’re plagued by side effects such as Barrett’s esophagitis, headaches, constipation and diarrhea, bloating, and fatigue.

The biggest misconception about acid reflux is that you must use a prescription drug to treat it. Other drugs treat reflux, such as antibiotics and histamine H2-receptor antagonists, but they are no more effective than PPIs.

Nutritional therapy and lifestyle modification treat acid reflux better than any pharmaceutical can. Our natural acid reflux treatment targets the cause, which is different for everyone.

We customize a program that determines food sensitivities and corrects the digestive system to help the esophageal sphincter close.

Many doctors believe acid reflux cannot be successfully reversed and that symptom management is the best any patient can hope for. We know that it can be corrected with the proper nutrition and digestive supplements.

For example, we use digestive bitters to help your stomach manufacture the correct amount of acid. When you have enough acid, food is digested properly, and the sphincter stays closed.

Most physicians don’t understand that everyone has different food-related reflux triggers. Often, acidic foods such as tomatoes and citrus fruits are one culprit.

For other people, chocolate or alcohol increases reflux. Any food you’re allergic to can cause flare-ups, and you may not know which foods you’re allergic to until you have a food sensitivity test.

When we begin your natural acid reflux treatment program, we determine which foods you may be sensitive to. This way, you can avoid those particular items only instead of giving up a wide range of food and drink.

We offer two food sensitivity tests, one for 96 foods and one for 184 foods. Sometimes, knowing your trigger foods is enough to decrease your acid reflux, but if it isn’t, we offer a comprehensive, nutrition-based program tailored to your needs.

The Cure Your Acid Reflux program is a physician-supervised program that includes:

  • A comprehensive acid reflux symptom evaluation.
  • Option for food sensitivity testing for 96 or 184 foods.
  • Tailored nutrition and supplement program based on your evaluation and food sensitivity test.
  • If necessary, four exclusive healing support products, including:

Repair, to support a healthy esophagus and digestive system.

Relieve, to correct bacterial imbalance in the gut.

Replenish probiotic, to restore beneficial gut bacteria.

Digestive bitters, to support normal stomach function.

  • Two one-on-one personal coaching sessions with your Cure Your Acid Reflux Coach.
  • Unlimited email and phone support.

Do you have questions?

Are you ready to reverse your acid reflux?

If so, please call or email us today, and we’ll get started.

3 Acid Reflux Myths

hot wingsAcid reflux myths. What don’t you know?

Acid reflux sufferers deal with more than just the pain and discomfort of flare-ups—they also struggle with misinformation. The surplus of information out there on GERD and chronic reflux contains its share of acid reflux myths, and we want to help educate you on what might be true, and what might be worth disregarding.

Knowing what info to trust will help you lead a freer, healthier life as you can put the legitimate solutions to practice—and ignore those remedies that might only harm you in the long run.

Drink Less Liquid with Your Meals to Reduce the Likelihood of Flare-ups: True

Staying hydrated between meals is far better for your body than overindulging in liquids while you eat.

When you drink too much during a meal, you’ll only dilute the acid in your stomach, which leads to discomfort, bloating, and belching. Using a smaller glass and drinking less will also decrease the likelihood of increasing the pH of your stomach juices—something that causes trouble for your esophageal sphincter.

Give Up Hot or Spicy Foods If You Have Acid Reflux: False

The outcry against spicy foods when it comes to acid reflux is noticeable. They say when acid reflux is a problem, spicy food is the first thing that should go, but the evidence against your favorite hot sauce or Mexican dish is underwhelming.

Although spicy foods can trigger heartburn, there’s no hard proof that giving them up will improve or cure your acid reflux. Eating spicy foods in moderation and making other lifestyle changes can be much more effective in the long run when managing your acid reflux.

Medication Is the Only Way to Treat Acid Reflux Successfully: False

Many people who suffer from acid reflux commit themselves to antacids and other drugs to mitigate and fight heartburn. When they find temporary relief, they depend on those medications for long-term relief as well, but they may risk long-term side effects instead.

Natural remedies such as lifestyle changes, massage, and meditation have proven themselves capable of eliminating flare-ups and even acid reflux altogether.

Natural remedies promote a healthier life by considering the bigger picture. Depending on over-the-counter antacids or prescription proton pump inhibitors won’t do anything to change what triggers your acid reflux, or address the behavior that leads to it.

Part of how we treat acid reflux is through education and support. We want to help you understand what might be causing your acid reflux so you can eliminate triggers or change behaviors that may be provoking flare-ups. Food sensitivity tests and one-on-one consultations provide the kind of support structure designed to treat the symptoms of acid reflux and the condition itself.